The State of South Carolina Public Education A SOUTHCAROLINACAN RESEARCH REPORT

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Introduction

Welcome to South Carolina’s State of Education report, your one-stop shop for the facts on South Carolina public schools.

This report provides snapshot comparisons to give you a taste of where we stand relative to other states, and also offers historical trend data to show what direction we are going in. We must, for example, do even more to recruit and retain diverse, highly effective educators and increase academic growth and proficiency for students who are furthest behind.

Consider the report a living document that will be updated as new data becomes available. We invite you to explore and interact with South Carolina’s State of Education report and use it to both to celebrate our students’ progress and engage in the conversation about the work left to do for South Carolina’s learners.

Coming soon in an addendum will be meaningful guidance on the policy decisions and investments we make as a state.

Students

Our education system

Student demographics

There are 763,588 students in South Carolina’s public schools. They differ in race, economic standing and native language, but every one of our children deserves a great school. Recent demographic trends show that student enrollment has been increasing by approximately 9,000 students statewide annually. White students comprise the majority of students in South Carolina, however these numbers have been declining over time, while other subgroup numbers have been increasing—most significant is the growing number of Hispanic students in South Carolina’s public schools.

K–12 enrollment by race/ethnicity
African American/Black
American Indian
Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Hispanic
White
African American/Black
American Indian
Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Hispanic
White
African American/Black
American Indian
Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Hispanic
White
African American/Black
American Indian
Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Hispanic
White

Notes:
1. Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.
2. Group names are reported here the same way they are reported in the original source. This holds true throughout the State of Public Education report.

K–12 enrollment by other subgroups
Low-income*
Low-income*
Low-income*

*Low-income students are those eligible for the National School Lunch Program. Students with family incomes below 130 percent of the Federal Poverty Level are entitled to free school lunch, and students with family incomes below 185 percent of the Federal Poverty Level are entitled to reduced-priced lunch. The 2015 Federal Poverty Level for a family of four was $24,250 in annual income.

Source
  1. Graphs 1 and 2: “Active Student Headcounts,” South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/data/other/student-counts/active-student-headcounts/.

Teachers

Our education system

Teacher demographics

South Carolina is facing a growing teacher shortage. Each year, 4,000 teachers leave our classrooms and our state institutions of higher education are only producing about 2,000 new teachers annually.

Full-time teachers by race/ethnicity
African American
American Indian
Asian
Hispanic
White

Note:
1. Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.

Full-time teachers by gender
Female
Male

Note:
1. 0.8% not reported

Source
  1. Graphs 1 and 2: “Quick Facts Education in South Carolina,” South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/scdoe/assets/File/data/Quick%20Facts/QuickFacts%202015%20May.pdf.

Teacher preparation

The demographics of South Carolina’s teaching population does not match our student population.

Teacher preparation program enrollment by race/ethnicity*
Black or African American
American Indian or Alaskan Native
Asian
Hispanic/Latino
White
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
Two or more Races

*The total number of enrolled candidates reported by teacher preparation programs does not match the number of candidates for whom race/ethnicity is reported. Therefore, race/ethnicity percentages are calculated using as the denominator the number of candidates for whom race/ethnicity is reported (4,816 candidates).

Note: Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.

Teacher preparation program enrollment by gender*
Female
Male

*The total number of enrolled candidates reported by teacher preparation programs does not match the number of candidates for whom gender is reported. Therefore, gender percentages are calculated using as the denominator the number of candidates for whom gender is reported (4,873 candidates).

Note: Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.

Number of candidates completing teacher preparation programs, by route
Label 2004–2005 2008–2009 2011–2012 2012–2013 2013–2014
Traditional preparation programs2,218N/A2,2862,3232,128
Alternative preparation programs312N/A313186213
Total completers2,530N/A2,5992,5092,341
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Top five credential areas pursued by teaching candidates in teacher preparation programs*
  • Elementary education
  • Early childhood
  • English
  • Social studies
  • Mathematics

*The total number of enrolled candidates reported by teacher preparation programs does not match the number of candidates for whom preparation in a specific credential area is reported. The top credential areas reported above are based on candidates for whom preparation in a specific credential area is reported.

Top five teacher shortage areas
  • Business education
  • Theatre
  • Industrial technology education
  • Foreign languages
  • Media specialist
  • Business education
  • Theatre
  • Industrial technology education
  • Foreign languages
  • Media specialist
  • Business education
  • Family/consumer science
  • Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Science)
  • Media specialist
  • Theatre
  • Agriculture
  • Media specialist
  • Business education
  • Dance
  • Health
Sources
  1. Graphs 1-4: “2015 Title II Reports,” U.S. Department of Education, last accessedd August 1, 2016, https://title2.ed.gov/Public/Home.aspx.
  2. Graph 5: “2014-15 SC Teacher Loan Program Annual Report,” Education Oversight Committee, p. 15, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://www.eoc.sc.gov/Reports%20%20Publications/Teacher%20Loan%20Report%20June%202016/Teacher%20Loan%20Report%20for%20Web.pdf.

Teacher effectiveness

South Carolina’s Assisting, Developing, and Evaluating Professional Teaching (ADEPT) system is designed to promote teacher effectiveness. Teachers are evaluated annually based on their contract level. Novice teachers can be given Induction contracts for up to three years until they undergo a summative evaluation. Upon successful completion of this evaluation, teachers are granted their professional license and placed on a Continuing Contract. The table below displays the evaluation results for all teachers evaluated in that given year, including both Induction and Continuing contract teachers.

Percentage of teachers rated at each level of effectiveness
ADEPT Standards not met
ADEPT Standards met
ADEPT Incomplete
ADEPT Results not reported
ADEPT Standards not met
ADEPT Standards met
ADEPT Incomplete
ADEPT Results not reported
Estimated average annual salary of teachers in public elementary and secondary schools (current dollars)
South Carolina
United States
South Carolina
United States
South Carolina
United States
South Carolina
United States
Sources
  1. Graph 1: “South Carolina Educator Evaluation Results for the 2013-14 Academic Year,” South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/scdoe/assets/file/programs-services/50/documents/2013-14_ADEPT_Report.pdf
  2. Graph 1: “South Carolina Educator Evaluation Results for the 2014-15 Academic Year,” South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/scdoe/assets/File/educators/teacher-evaluations/2014-15_ADEPT_Results.pdf.
  3. Graph 2: “Estimated average annual salary of teachers in public elementary and secondary schools, by state: Selected years, 1969-70 through 2014-15,” National Center for Education Statistics, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d15/tables/dt15_211.60.asp?current=yes.

Schools

Our education system

School types and options

South Carolina’s public education system is comprised of 82 school districts: 81 traditional districts and one statewide public charter school district. The vast majority of South Carolina students attend traditional public schools, however there are other options available across the state in the form of magnet schools and programs, public charter schools, montessori schools and programs, virtual education, home school options, and private schools.

Number of school districts
2010
2012
2014
2015
Number of public schools
All public schools: {{max}}
Traditional public schools
All public charter schools
Traditional public schools
All public charter schools
Traditional public schools
All public charter schools
Traditional public schools
All public charter schools
Public school enrollment
All public schools: {{max}}
Traditional public schools
Charter public schools
Traditional public schools
Charter public schools
Private schools
Label 2013 2011 2007 2003
Number of private school students65,35060,89071,43073,800
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Public school enrollment by race/ethnicity
African American/Black
American Indian
Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Hispanic
White
African American/Black
American Indian
Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Hispanic
White

Note: Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.

Charter public school geography
Rural
Town
Suburb
City
Rural
Town
Suburb
City
Rural
Town
Suburb
City
Sources
  1. Graph 1: “2014 Report Card Ratings,” Education Oversight Committee, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://www.eoc.sc.gov/reportsandpublications/2012reportcards/Pages/default.aspx.
  2. Graph 1: “2015 Data Files,” South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/data/report-cards/state-report-cards/2015/.
  3. Graph 2: “Charter School Data Dashboard, South Carolina,” National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://dashboard2.publiccharters.org/State/?state=SC.
  4. Graph 3: “Active Student Headcounts,” South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/data/other/student-counts/active-student-headcounts/.
  5. Graph 3: “Charter School Data Dashboard, South Carolina,” National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://dashboard2.publiccharters.org/State/?state=SC.
  6. Graph 4: “Private elementary and secondary schools, enrollment, teachers, and high school graduates, by state: Selected years, 2003 through 2013,” U.S. Department of Education National Center for Education Statistics, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d15/tables/dt15_205.80.asp?current=yes.
  7. Graph 5: “Active Student Headcounts: School Headcount by Gender and Race 2014-15,” South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/data/other/student-counts/active-student-headcounts/.
  8. Graph 6: “Charter School Data Dashboard, South Carolina,” National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://dashboard2.publiccharters.org/State/?state=SC.

Pre-kindergarten access

In South Carolina, early education services are managed by two offices: 1) the Office of Early Learning and Literacy (OELL) within the SC Department of Education (SCDE) that works with the public schools and 2) the Office of SC First Steps to School Readiness (First Steps) that works with the private child-care centers. Public school districts are required to offer at least one part-day pre-K program and since 2014–15 all pre-K students are given a readiness assessment. Total pre-K spending in 2014–15 was $60.2 million.

South Carolina has two state-funded preschool programs: 1) the EIA Child Development Program (also called 4K) and 2) the Child Development Education Program (CDEP).

The EIA Child Development Program was South Carolina’s first early education initiative establishing funding for 4K services back in 1984. Currently, 19,757 children are served under this program in 25.3% of districts. These districts set their own eligibility criteria from a state-specified list of risk factors that include low parents education, history of foster care, homelessness, teen parents, and low income. About 25% of these programs are full-day.

The Child Development Education Program (CDEP) was the second early education initiative – the result of a 2006 court ruling. The state was required to provide funding for school-day preschool in the counties named in the lawsuit if they opted to participate. Children eligible for CDEP qualified for free or reduced-price lunch, those receiving Medicaid, or those with a documented developmental delay. The CDEP pilot was codified with the passage of Act 284 under the Read to Succeed legislation in 2014, expanding the program to serve 68.6% of districts.

Percentage of 3- and 4-year-olds not attending school (public or private)
South Carolina
United States
South Carolina
United States
South Carolina
United States

Note: These figures are estimates based on U.S. Census data.

Access to state-funded and federally funded pre-K programs
Label Value
Percentage of 3-year-olds enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs4%
Percentage of 4-year-olds enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs47%
Total enrollment in state-funded pre-K programs30,422
Percentage of 3-year-olds enrolled in Head Start* programs11%
Percentage of 4-year-olds enrolled in Head Start* programs9%
Head Start* enrollment (3- and 4-year-olds)11,553
South Carolina’s national ranking in access to state-funded pre-K programs for 3-year-olds (National Institute for Early Education Research)17 out of 28
South Carolina’s national ranking in access to state-funded pre-K programs for 4-year-olds (National Institute for Early Education Research)11 out of 42
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Label Value
Percentage of 3-year-olds enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs3%
Percentage of 4-year-olds enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs38%
Total enrollment in state-funded pre-K programs24,563
Percentage of 3-year-olds enrolled in Head Start* programs10%
Percentage of 4-year-olds enrolled in Head Start* programs10%
Head Start* enrollment (3- and 4-year-olds)11,979
South Carolina’s national ranking in access to state-funded pre-K programs for 3-year-olds (National Institute for Early Education Research)15 out of 24
South Carolina’s national ranking in access to state-funded pre-K programs for 4-year-olds (National Institute for Early Education Research)11 out of 40
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Label Value
Percentage of 3-year-olds enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs4%
Percentage of 4-year-olds enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs31%
Total enrollment in state-funded pre-K programs20,117
Percentage of 3-year-olds enrolled in Head Start* programs10%
Percentage of 4-year-olds enrolled in Head Start* programs11%
Head Start* enrollment (3- and 4-year-olds)11,723
South Carolina’s national ranking in access to state-funded pre-K programs for 3-year-olds (National Institute for Early Education Research)10 out of 26
South Carolina’s national ranking in access to state-funded pre-K programs for 4-year-olds (National Institute for Early Education Research)8 out of 40
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Label Value
Percentage of 3-year-olds enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs1%
Percentage of 4-year-olds enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs29%
Total enrollment in state-funded pre-K programs16,000
Percentage of 3-year-olds enrolled in Head Start* programs11%
Percentage of 4-year-olds enrolled in Head Start* programs10%
Head Start* enrollment (3- and 4-year-olds)10,725
South Carolina’s national ranking in access to state-funded pre-K programs for 3-year-olds (National Institute for Early Education Research)21 out of 23
South Carolina’s national ranking in access to state-funded pre-K programs for 4-year-olds (National Institute for Early Education Research)4 out of 37
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*Head Start is federally funded

Note:
Rankings are not out of 50 states because not all states have state-funded pre-K programs.

Sources
  1. “The State of Preschool 2015: State Profiles: South Carolina,” National Institute for Early Education Research, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://nieer.org/research/state-preschool-2015-state-profiles.
  2. Graph 1: "American Fact Finder," U.S. Census Bureau, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t.
  3. Graph 2: "Annual State Pre-K Reports: State Preschool Yearbooks," National Institute for Early Education Research, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://nieer.org/publications/annual-state-pre-k-reports-state-preschool-yearbooks.

Kindergarten access

Percentage of eligible children enrolled in kindergarten programs
South Carolina
United States
Source
  1. “South Carolina State Highlight 2016,” Education Week Research Center, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://www.edweek.org/media/ew/qc/2016/shr/16shr.sc.h35.pdf.

The cost

Our education system

Expenditures

Overall, the per pupil expenditures in South Carolina have increased but at a very slow pace. As enrollment rises, districts have had to bear an added burden of stretching slightly more resources to accommodate a growing number of students. While there is an additional per pupil weight for students in poverty, South Carolina would benefit from introducing an additional funding allocation for districts with concentrated numbers of students in poverty.

Current expenditures per pupil for public elementary and secondary schools in South Carolina (not adjusted for inflation)
2002–2003
2003–2004
2004–2005
2005–2006
2006–2007
2007–2008
2008–2009
2009–2010
2010–2011
2011–2012
2012–2013

Note:
Current expenditures include instruction, support services, food services, and enterprise operations.

Current expenditures per pupil in fall enrollment in public elementary and secondary schools (not adjusted for inflation)
 Value
1. District of Columbia
District of Columbia
$20,530Value
$20,530
2. New York
New York
$19,529Value
$19,529
3. New Jersey
New Jersey
$18,523Value
$18,523
4. Alaska
Alaska
$18,217Value
$18,217
5. Connecticut
Connecticut
$17,321Value
$17,321
6. Vermont
Vermont
$17,286Value
$17,286
7. Wyoming
Wyoming
$15,815Value
$15,815
8. Massachusetts
Massachusetts
$15,321Value
$15,321
9. Rhode Island
Rhode Island
$14,889Value
$14,889
10. Maryland
Maryland
$14,086Value
$14,086
11. New Hampshire
New Hampshire
$14,050Value
$14,050
12. Delaware
Delaware
$13,653Value
$13,653
13. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
$13,445Value
$13,445
14. Maine
Maine
$12,655Value
$12,655
15. Illinois
Illinois
$12,443Value
$12,443
T-16. Hawaii
Hawaii
$11,743Value
$11,743
T-16. Nebraska
Nebraska
$11,743Value
$11,743
18. North Dakota
North Dakota
$11,615Value
$11,615
19. Ohio
Ohio
$11,276Value
$11,276
20. West Virginia
West Virginia
$11,257Value
$11,257
21. Wisconsin
Wisconsin
$11,186Value
$11,186
22. Minnesota
Minnesota
$11,065Value
$11,065
23. Virginia
Virginia
$10,960Value
$10,960
United States
United States
$10,763Value
$10,763
24. Montana
Montana
$10,662Value
$10,662
25. Louisiana
Louisiana
$10,539Value
$10,539
26. Michigan
Michigan
$10,515Value
$10,515
27. Iowa
Iowa
$10,291Value
$10,291
28. Kansas
Kansas
$10,011Value
$10,011
29. Washington
Washington
$9,714Value
$9,714
30. Missouri
Missouri
$9,702Value
$9,702
31. Arkansas
Arkansas
$9,538Value
$9,538
32. South Carolina
South Carolina
$9,444Value
$9,444
33. Indiana
Indiana
$9,421Value
$9,421
34. Kentucky
Kentucky
$9,274Value
$9,274
35. California
California
$9,258Value
$9,258
36. Oregon
Oregon
$9,183Value
$9,183
37. New Mexico
New Mexico
$9,164Value
$9,164
38. Georgia
Georgia
$9,121Value
$9,121
39. Alabama
Alabama
$8,773Value
$8,773
40. Colorado
Colorado
$8,693Value
$8,693
41. South Dakota
South Dakota
$8,630Value
$8,630
42. Florida
Florida
$8,623Value
$8,623
43. Tennessee
Tennessee
$8,588Value
$8,588
44. North Carolina
North Carolina
$8,342Value
$8,342
45. Texas
Texas
$8,261Value
$8,261
46. Mississippi
Mississippi
$8,117Value
$8,117
47. Nevada
Nevada
$8,026Value
$8,026
48. Oklahoma
Oklahoma
$7,914Value
$7,914
49. Arizona
Arizona
$7,495Value
$7,495
50. Idaho
Idaho
$6,761Value
$6,761
51. Utah
Utah
$6,432Value
$6,432
 Value
1. District of Columbia
District of Columbia
$20,530Value
$20,530
2. New York
New York
$19,529Value
$19,529
3. New Jersey
New Jersey
$18,523Value
$18,523
4. Alaska
Alaska
$18,217Value
$18,217
5. Connecticut
Connecticut
$17,321Value
$17,321
6. Vermont
Vermont
$17,286Value
$17,286
7. Wyoming
Wyoming
$15,815Value
$15,815
8. Massachusetts
Massachusetts
$15,321Value
$15,321
9. Rhode Island
Rhode Island
$14,889Value
$14,889
10. Maryland
Maryland
$14,086Value
$14,086
11. New Hampshire
New Hampshire
$14,050Value
$14,050
12. Delaware
Delaware
$13,653Value
$13,653
13. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
$13,445Value
$13,445
14. Maine
Maine
$12,655Value
$12,655
15. Illinois
Illinois
$12,443Value
$12,443
T-16. Hawaii
Hawaii
$11,743Value
$11,743
T-16. Nebraska
Nebraska
$11,743Value
$11,743
18. North Dakota
North Dakota
$11,615Value
$11,615
 Value
19. Ohio
Ohio
$11,276Value
$11,276
20. West Virginia
West Virginia
$11,257Value
$11,257
21. Wisconsin
Wisconsin
$11,186Value
$11,186
22. Minnesota
Minnesota
$11,065Value
$11,065
23. Virginia
Virginia
$10,960Value
$10,960
United States
United States
$10,763Value
$10,763
24. Montana
Montana
$10,662Value
$10,662
25. Louisiana
Louisiana
$10,539Value
$10,539
26. Michigan
Michigan
$10,515Value
$10,515
27. Iowa
Iowa
$10,291Value
$10,291
28. Kansas
Kansas
$10,011Value
$10,011
29. Washington
Washington
$9,714Value
$9,714
30. Missouri
Missouri
$9,702Value
$9,702
31. Arkansas
Arkansas
$9,538Value
$9,538
32. South Carolina
South Carolina
$9,444Value
$9,444
33. Indiana
Indiana
$9,421Value
$9,421
34. Kentucky
Kentucky
$9,274Value
$9,274
35. California
California
$9,258Value
$9,258
 Value
36. Oregon
Oregon
$9,183Value
$9,183
37. New Mexico
New Mexico
$9,164Value
$9,164
38. Georgia
Georgia
$9,121Value
$9,121
39. Alabama
Alabama
$8,773Value
$8,773
40. Colorado
Colorado
$8,693Value
$8,693
41. South Dakota
South Dakota
$8,630Value
$8,630
42. Florida
Florida
$8,623Value
$8,623
43. Tennessee
Tennessee
$8,588Value
$8,588
44. North Carolina
North Carolina
$8,342Value
$8,342
45. Texas
Texas
$8,261Value
$8,261
46. Mississippi
Mississippi
$8,117Value
$8,117
47. Nevada
Nevada
$8,026Value
$8,026
48. Oklahoma
Oklahoma
$7,914Value
$7,914
49. Arizona
Arizona
$7,495Value
$7,495
50. Idaho
Idaho
$6,761Value
$6,761
51. Utah
Utah
$6,432Value
$6,432
 Value
1. New Jersey
New Jersey
$12,568Value
$12,568
2. New York
New York
$11,961Value
$11,961
3. District of Columbia
District of Columbia
$11,847Value
$11,847
4. Connecticut
Connecticut
$11,057Value
$11,057
5. Massachusetts
Massachusetts
$10,460Value
$10,460
6. Vermont
Vermont
$10,454Value
$10,454
7. Rhode Island
Rhode Island
$10,349Value
$10,349
8. Alaska
Alaska
$9,870Value
$9,870
9. Delaware
Delaware
$9,693Value
$9,693
10. Maine
Maine
$9,344Value
$9,344
11. Maryland
Maryland
$9,153Value
$9,153
12. Wisconsin
Wisconsin
$9,004Value
$9,004
13. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
$8,997Value
$8,997
14. Wyoming
Wyoming
$8,985Value
$8,985
15. Michigan
Michigan
$8,781Value
$8,781
16. Ohio
Ohio
$8,632Value
$8,632
17. New Hampshire
New Hampshire
$8,579Value
$8,579
18. West Virginia
West Virginia
$8,319Value
$8,319
19. Illinois
Illinois
$8,287Value
$8,287
20. Minnesota
Minnesota
$8,109Value
$8,109
21. Hawaii
Hawaii
$8,100Value
$8,100
22. Nebraska
Nebraska
$8,074Value
$8,074
23. Indiana
Indiana
$8,057Value
$8,057
United States
United States
$8,044Value
$8,044
24. Virginia
Virginia
$7,822Value
$7,822
25. Georgia
Georgia
$7,774Value
$7,774
26. Iowa
Iowa
$7,574Value
$7,574
27. California
California
$7,552Value
$7,552
28. Montana
Montana
$7,496Value
$7,496
29. Missouri
Missouri
$7,495Value
$7,495
30. Oregon
Oregon
$7,491Value
$7,491
31. Kansas
Kansas
$7,454Value
$7,454
32. Colorado
Colorado
$7,384Value
$7,384
33. Washington
Washington
$7,252Value
$7,252
34. Texas
Texas
$7,136Value
$7,136
35. New Mexico
New Mexico
$7,125Value
$7,125
36. South Carolina
South Carolina
$7,040Value
$7,040
37. Louisiana
Louisiana
$6,922Value
$6,922
38. North Dakota
North Dakota
$6,870Value
$6,870
39. Kentucky
Kentucky
$6,661Value
$6,661
40. North Carolina
North Carolina
$6,562Value
$6,562
41. South Dakota
South Dakota
$6,547Value
$6,547
42. Arkansas
Arkansas
$6,482Value
$6,482
43. Florida
Florida
$6,439Value
$6,439
44. Alabama
Alabama
$6,300Value
$6,300
45. Arizona
Arizona
$6,283Value
$6,283
46. Tennessee
Tennessee
$6,118Value
$6,118
T-47. Nevada
Nevada
$6,092Value
$6,092
T-47. Oklahoma
Oklahoma
$6,092Value
$6,092
49. Idaho
Idaho
$6,081Value
$6,081
50. Mississippi
Mississippi
$5,792Value
$5,792
51. Utah
Utah
$4,838Value
$4,838
 Value
1. New Jersey
New Jersey
$12,568Value
$12,568
2. New York
New York
$11,961Value
$11,961
3. District of Columbia
District of Columbia
$11,847Value
$11,847
4. Connecticut
Connecticut
$11,057Value
$11,057
5. Massachusetts
Massachusetts
$10,460Value
$10,460
6. Vermont
Vermont
$10,454Value
$10,454
7. Rhode Island
Rhode Island
$10,349Value
$10,349
8. Alaska
Alaska
$9,870Value
$9,870
9. Delaware
Delaware
$9,693Value
$9,693
10. Maine
Maine
$9,344Value
$9,344
11. Maryland
Maryland
$9,153Value
$9,153
12. Wisconsin
Wisconsin
$9,004Value
$9,004
13. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
$8,997Value
$8,997
14. Wyoming
Wyoming
$8,985Value
$8,985
15. Michigan
Michigan
$8,781Value
$8,781
16. Ohio
Ohio
$8,632Value
$8,632
17. New Hampshire
New Hampshire
$8,579Value
$8,579
18. West Virginia
West Virginia
$8,319Value
$8,319
 Value
19. Illinois
Illinois
$8,287Value
$8,287
20. Minnesota
Minnesota
$8,109Value
$8,109
21. Hawaii
Hawaii
$8,100Value
$8,100
22. Nebraska
Nebraska
$8,074Value
$8,074
23. Indiana
Indiana
$8,057Value
$8,057
United States
United States
$8,044Value
$8,044
24. Virginia
Virginia
$7,822Value
$7,822
25. Georgia
Georgia
$7,774Value
$7,774
26. Iowa
Iowa
$7,574Value
$7,574
27. California
California
$7,552Value
$7,552
28. Montana
Montana
$7,496Value
$7,496
29. Missouri
Missouri
$7,495Value
$7,495
30. Oregon
Oregon
$7,491Value
$7,491
31. Kansas
Kansas
$7,454Value
$7,454
32. Colorado
Colorado
$7,384Value
$7,384
33. Washington
Washington
$7,252Value
$7,252
34. Texas
Texas
$7,136Value
$7,136
35. New Mexico
New Mexico
$7,125Value
$7,125
 Value
36. South Carolina
South Carolina
$7,040Value
$7,040
37. Louisiana
Louisiana
$6,922Value
$6,922
38. North Dakota
North Dakota
$6,870Value
$6,870
39. Kentucky
Kentucky
$6,661Value
$6,661
40. North Carolina
North Carolina
$6,562Value
$6,562
41. South Dakota
South Dakota
$6,547Value
$6,547
42. Arkansas
Arkansas
$6,482Value
$6,482
43. Florida
Florida
$6,439Value
$6,439
44. Alabama
Alabama
$6,300Value
$6,300
45. Arizona
Arizona
$6,283Value
$6,283
46. Tennessee
Tennessee
$6,118Value
$6,118
T-47. Nevada
Nevada
$6,092Value
$6,092
T-47. Oklahoma
Oklahoma
$6,092Value
$6,092
49. Idaho
Idaho
$6,081Value
$6,081
50. Mississippi
Mississippi
$5,792Value
$5,792
51. Utah
Utah
$4,838Value
$4,838

Notes:
1. Student expenditures from a national source may not match expenditures from a state source due to different expenditures being excluded.
2. State disparities in current per-pupil expenditures may exist based on what states classify as current expenses (for example, states set different capitalization thresholds that determine which expenses qualify as capital outlays and which do not).

Sources
  1. “Current expenditure per pupil in fall enrollment in public elementary and secondary schools, by state or jurisdiction,” U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d13/tables/dt13_236.65.asp.
  2. “Current expenditure per pupil in fall enrollment in public elementary and secondary schools, by state or jurisdiction,” U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/index.asp.

Revenues

Funding for South Carolina’s public elementary and secondary schools is derived from local, state, and federal sources. In 2002–2003, the national average revenue distribution was 8.5% from the federal level, 48.7% from the state level, and 42.8% from local sources. Federal and local spending increased slightly by 2012–2013, with a national average of 9.3% federal, 45.2% state, and 45.5% local.

Percentage of revenues for public elementary and secondary schools, by source
 FederalStateLocal
United States 9.3 45.2 45.5
Alabama 11.8 54.8 33.4
Alaska 12.1 68.5 19.3
Arizona 13.6 42.2 44.1
Arkansas 12.1 51.9 35.9
California 11.2 54.3 34.5
Colorado 7.9 42.3 49.8
Connecticut 4.4 39.5 56.2
Delaware 10.1 58.8 31.1
Florida 12.6 38.6 48.8
Georgia 10.7 43.6 45.8
Hawaii 13.3 84.2 2.5
Idaho 11.9 64.0 24.0
Illinois 8.6 26.1 65.3
Indiana 8.7 56.0 35.3
Iowa 7.8 51.7 40.5
Kansas 8.6 55.1 36.4
Kentucky 12.3 54.5 33.2
Louisiana 15.2 43.3 41.6
Maine 7.6 39.9 52.5
Maryland 6.0 44.2 49.8
Massachusetts 5.7 39.4 54.9
Michigan 9.8 58.7 31.5
Minnesota 6.3 64.5 29.2
Mississippi 16.1 50.4 33.5
Missouri 9.0 32.8 58.2
Montana 12.9 48.1 39.0
Nebraska 9.4 32.0 58.5
Nevada 9.7 33.7 56.5
New Hampshire 5.7 35.5 58.8
New Jersey 4.4 40.8 54.8
New Mexico 15.2 68.6 16.2
New York 5.5 40.1 54.4
North Carolina 12.6 62.2 25.2
North Dakota 11.8 51.0 37.3
Ohio 8.6 43.5 47.9
Oklahoma 12.4 49.2 38.5
Oregon 9.2 49.4 41.4
Pennsylvania 8.0 35.9 56.2
Rhode Island 8.7 38.9 52.4
South Carolina 10.0 46.4 43.6
South Dakota 15.0 31.2 53.8
Tennessee 13.0 45.7 41.3
Texas 11.7 40.2 48.0
Utah 9.2 52.0 38.7
Vermont 7.1 88.9 4.0
Virginia 7.3 38.9 53.7
Washington 8.6 59.0 32.4
West Virginia 10.7 59.0 30.3
Wisconsin 7.9 45.0 47.2
Wyoming 6.7 52.0 41.3
 FederalStateLocal
United States 9.3 45.2 45.5
Alabama 11.8 54.8 33.4
Alaska 12.1 68.5 19.3
Arizona 13.6 42.2 44.1
Arkansas 12.1 51.9 35.9
California 11.2 54.3 34.5
Colorado 7.9 42.3 49.8
Connecticut 4.4 39.5 56.2
Delaware 10.1 58.8 31.1
Florida 12.6 38.6 48.8
Georgia 10.7 43.6 45.8
Hawaii 13.3 84.2 2.5
Idaho 11.9 64.0 24.0
Illinois 8.6 26.1 65.3
Indiana 8.7 56.0 35.3
Iowa 7.8 51.7 40.5
Kansas 8.6 55.1 36.4
Kentucky 12.3 54.5 33.2
Louisiana 15.2 43.3 41.6
Maine 7.6 39.9 52.5
Maryland 6.0 44.2 49.8
Massachusetts 5.7 39.4 54.9
Michigan 9.8 58.7 31.5
Minnesota 6.3 64.5 29.2
Mississippi 16.1 50.4 33.5
Missouri 9.0 32.8 58.2
 FederalStateLocal
Montana 12.9 48.1 39.0
Nebraska 9.4 32.0 58.5
Nevada 9.7 33.7 56.5
New Hampshire 5.7 35.5 58.8
New Jersey 4.4 40.8 54.8
New Mexico 15.2 68.6 16.2
New York 5.5 40.1 54.4
North Carolina 12.6 62.2 25.2
North Dakota 11.8 51.0 37.3
Ohio 8.6 43.5 47.9
Oklahoma 12.4 49.2 38.5
Oregon 9.2 49.4 41.4
Pennsylvania 8.0 35.9 56.2
Rhode Island 8.7 38.9 52.4
South Carolina 10.0 46.4 43.6
South Dakota 15.0 31.2 53.8
Tennessee 13.0 45.7 41.3
Texas 11.7 40.2 48.0
Utah 9.2 52.0 38.7
Vermont 7.1 88.9 4.0
Virginia 7.3 38.9 53.7
Washington 8.6 59.0 32.4
West Virginia 10.7 59.0 30.3
Wisconsin 7.9 45.0 47.2
Wyoming 6.7 52.0 41.3
 FederalStateLocal
United States 8.5 48.7 42.8
Alabama 11.6 57.6 30.9
Alaska 17.7 56.8 25.5
Arizona 11.4 48.4 40.2
Arkansas 11.7 55.2 33.0
California 9.9 58.9 31.3
Colorado 6.5 43.1 50.4
Connecticut 5.2 37.4 57.4
Delaware 8.6 63.4 28.0
Florida 10.5 43.6 45.8
Georgia 8.1 48.2 43.7
Hawaii 8.2 90.1 1.7
Idaho 9.8 59.1 31.1
Illinois 8.5 33.0 58.5
Indiana 7.6 58.8 33.5
Iowa 7.4 46.6 46.0
Kansas 9.1 57.1 33.8
Kentucky 10.6 58.8 30.7
Louisiana 13.2 49.1 37.7
Maine 8.9 42.9 48.1
Maryland 6.7 38.3 55.0
Massachusetts 6.0 40.9 53.1
Michigan 7.8 63.3 28.9
Minnesota 5.9 73.8 20.2
Mississippi 15.4 53.8 30.8
Missouri 8.0 35.8 56.2
Montana 14.5 46.3 39.2
Nebraska 8.9 34.4 56.7
Nevada 7.0 30.2 62.8
New Hampshire 5.2 48.9 45.9
New Jersey 4.3 43.5 52.2
New Mexico 15.0 72.1 12.9
New York 7.0 45.6 47.5
North Carolina 9.6 63.7 26.7
North Dakota 15.3 36.8 47.9
Ohio 6.4 44.8 48.7
Oklahoma 12.7 54.7 32.6
Oregon 9.1 50.9 40.0
Pennsylvania 7.7 36.6 55.6
Rhode Island 6.5 42.0 51.5
South Carolina 9.8 48.1 42.1
South Dakota 15.7 33.7 50.6
Tennessee 10.0 43.8 46.1
Texas 9.9 40.9 49.2
Utah 9.3 56.4 34.3
Vermont 7.0 67.8 25.3
Virginia 6.6 39.6 53.8
Washington 9.0 61.8 29.2
West Virginia 10.6 61.4 27.9
Wisconsin 6.1 53.4 40.6
Wyoming 8.8 50.9 40.3
 FederalStateLocal
United States 8.5 48.7 42.8
Alabama 11.6 57.6 30.9
Alaska 17.7 56.8 25.5
Arizona 11.4 48.4 40.2
Arkansas 11.7 55.2 33.0
California 9.9 58.9 31.3
Colorado 6.5 43.1 50.4
Connecticut 5.2 37.4 57.4
Delaware 8.6 63.4 28.0
Florida 10.5 43.6 45.8
Georgia 8.1 48.2 43.7
Hawaii 8.2 90.1 1.7
Idaho 9.8 59.1 31.1
Illinois 8.5 33.0 58.5
Indiana 7.6 58.8 33.5
Iowa 7.4 46.6 46.0
Kansas 9.1 57.1 33.8
Kentucky 10.6 58.8 30.7
Louisiana 13.2 49.1 37.7
Maine 8.9 42.9 48.1
Maryland 6.7 38.3 55.0
Massachusetts 6.0 40.9 53.1
Michigan 7.8 63.3 28.9
Minnesota 5.9 73.8 20.2
Mississippi 15.4 53.8 30.8
Missouri 8.0 35.8 56.2
 FederalStateLocal
Montana 14.5 46.3 39.2
Nebraska 8.9 34.4 56.7
Nevada 7.0 30.2 62.8
New Hampshire 5.2 48.9 45.9
New Jersey 4.3 43.5 52.2
New Mexico 15.0 72.1 12.9
New York 7.0 45.6 47.5
North Carolina 9.6 63.7 26.7
North Dakota 15.3 36.8 47.9
Ohio 6.4 44.8 48.7
Oklahoma 12.7 54.7 32.6
Oregon 9.1 50.9 40.0
Pennsylvania 7.7 36.6 55.6
Rhode Island 6.5 42.0 51.5
South Carolina 9.8 48.1 42.1
South Dakota 15.7 33.7 50.6
Tennessee 10.0 43.8 46.1
Texas 9.9 40.9 49.2
Utah 9.3 56.4 34.3
Vermont 7.0 67.8 25.3
Virginia 6.6 39.6 53.8
Washington 9.0 61.8 29.2
West Virginia 10.6 61.4 27.9
Wisconsin 6.1 53.4 40.6
Wyoming 8.8 50.9 40.3
State and local revenues by district poverty level in South Carolina
Highest poverty districts
2nd quartile
3rd quartile
Lowest poverty districts

Note: District poverty level is measured by the percentage of students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch.

Sources
  1. Graph 1: “Revenues for public elementary and secondary schools, by source of funds and state or jurisdiction: 2002-03,” U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/index.asp.
  2. Graph 1: “Revenues for public elementary and secondary schools, by source of funds and state or jurisdiction: 2012-13,” U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/index.asp.
  3. Graph 2: “The State of Funding Equity Data Tool,” The Education Trust, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://edtrust.org/map/.

K–12 achievement

How the system is working

School performance grades

South Carolina is currently establishing a new school accountability system. Schools have not been assigned performance grades since the 2013–14 school year. Under the previous system, schools and districts were rated on a five-tiered scale. Schools performing at the lowest tier were rated “At-Risk” and schools performing at the highest tier were rated “Excellent.”

Percentage of schools receiving each performance grade
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
At-Risk

Note:
All public charter schools are included, but career and technology centers or special schools as well as 25 elementary, middle, and high schools that did not receive report card ratings were not included.

Source
  1. “At-a-Glance 2014 Annual School and District Ratings Release,” S.C. Education Oversight Committee, (November 2014), http://www.eoc.sc.gov/meetings/Pages/default.aspx.

State assessment proficiency rates

Percentage of students proficient in mathematics, grade 4 (ACT Aspire)
All students
Hispanic or Latino
American Indian or Alaskan Native
Asian
Black or African American
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
White
Two or more races
Disabled
Limited English Proficiency
Students in Poverty

Note:
Only one year of this assessment, ACT Aspire, is available. A new assessment, SC READY, was adopted and implemented starting in Spring 2016.

Percentage of students proficient in reading, grade 4 (ACT Aspire)
All students
Hispanic or Latino
American Indian or Alaskan Native
Asian
Black or African American
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
White
Two or more races
Disabled
Limited English Proficiency
Students in Poverty

Note:
Only one year of this assessment, ACT Aspire, is available. A new assessment, SC READY, was adopted and implemented starting in Spring 2016.

Percentage of students proficient in mathematics, grade 8 (ACT Aspire)
All students
Hispanic or Latino
American Indian or Alaskan Native
Asian
Black or African American
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
White
Two or more races
Disabled
Limited English Proficiency
Students in Poverty

Note:
Only one year of this assessment, ACT Aspire, is available. A new assessment, SC READY, was adopted and implemented starting in Spring 2016.

Percentage of students proficient in reading, grade 8 (ACT Aspire)
All students
Hispanic or Latino
American Indian or Alaskan Native
Asian
Black or African American
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
White
Two or more races
Disabled
Limited English Proficiency
Students in Poverty

Note:
Only one year of this assessment, ACT Aspire, is available. A new assessment, SC READY, was adopted and implemented starting in Spring 2016.

Source
  1. Graphs 1-4: “State Score by Grade Level and Demographic Category, South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/data/test-scores/state-assessments/act-aspire-test-scores/2015/state-aspire-scores-demo/?ID=999999.

National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) proficiency rates

Every two years, the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP)—also known as “The Nation’s Report Card”—tests a sample of students across the U.S., allowing us to assess both our students’ overall proficiency and how South Carolina students are faring relative to their peers in other states.

Percentage of South Carolina students scoring proficient or advanced on NAEP: 4th grade math
Percentage of South Carolina students scoring proficient or advanced on NAEP: 4th grade reading
Percentage of South Carolina students scoring proficient or advanced on NAEP: 8th grade math
Percentage of South Carolina students scoring proficient or advanced on NAEP: 8th grade reading
South Carolina’s national ranking* in NAEP proficiency: 4th grade reading (proficiency rates in parentheses)
All students
White
Black
Hispanic
Low-income
All students
White
Black
Hispanic
Low-income

*Rankings include D.C. but are not always out of 51. NAEP does not test every student—it tests a sample of students in each state—and therefore states with small populations of racial/ethnic subgroups do not have large enough samples of those students to report proficiency rates.

South Carolina’s national ranking* in NAEP proficiency gap size: 4th grade reading (largest gap ranked first)
White/Black gap
White/Hispanic gap
Non-low-income/low-income gap
White/Black gap
White/Hispanic gap
Non-low-income/low-income gap

*Rankings include D.C. but are not always out of 51. NAEP does not test every student—it tests a sample of students in each state—and therefore states with small populations of racial/ethnic subgroups do not have large enough samples of those students to report proficiency rates.

South Carolina’s national ranking* in NAEP proficiency: 8th grade math (proficiency rates in parentheses)
All students
White
Black
Hispanic
Low-income
All students
White
Black
Hispanic
Low-income

*Rankings include D.C. but are not always out of 51. NAEP does not test every student—it tests a sample of students in each state—and therefore states with small populations of racial/ethnic subgroups do not have large enough samples of those students to report proficiency rates.

South Carolina’s national ranking* in NAEP proficiency gap size: 8th grade math (largest gap ranked first)
White/Black gap
White/Hispanic gap
Non-low-income/low-income gap
White/Black gap
White/Hispanic gap
Non-low-income/low-income gap

*Rankings include D.C. but are not always out of 51. NAEP does not test every student—it tests a sample of students in each state—and therefore states with small populations of racial/ethnic subgroups do not have large enough samples of those students to report proficiency rates.

Source
  1. Graphs 1-8: “NAEP Data Explorer,” U.S. Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/naepdata/dataset.aspx.

Proficiency by international standards

A recent report used NAEP data to show how students across the U.S. measure up to international standards in reading and math. Only about one-third of American students hit the international standard for proficiency, and in South Carolina the percentages were similar in math and lower in reading.

Percentage of students hitting international reading and math benchmarks*

*Calculated using NAEP scores as a proxy for scores on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA).

Source
  1. “Globally Challenged: Are U.S. Students Ready to Compete?” Harvard Kennedy School, last accessed July 5, 2016, https://www.hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/PEPG11-03_GloballyChallenged.pdf.

High school graduation rates

South Carolina’s four-year cohort graduation rates
All Students
African American
White
Hispanic
American Indian/Alaskan
Asian/Pacific Islander

Note:
Four-year cohort graduation rates are the percentage of students from the original freshmen cohort who graduated in four years with a high school diploma.

South Carolina’s national rankings in four-year cohort graduation rates
All students
American Indian/Alaska Native
Asian/Pacific Islander
Black
Hispanic
White
Low-income
Limited English proficiency
Students with disabilities
All students
American Indian/Alaska Native
Asian/Pacific Islander
Black
Hispanic
White
Low-income
Limited English proficiency
Students with disabilities
All students
American Indian/Alaska Native
Asian/Pacific Islander
Black
Hispanic
White
Low-income
Limited English proficiency
Students with disabilities
All students
American Indian/Alaska Native
Asian/Pacific Islander
Black
Hispanic
White
Low-income
Limited English proficiency
Students with disabilities

Note:
Rankings include D.C. but are not always out of 51. Some states did not report graduation rates for certain subgroups in certain years to the U.S. Department of Education, the source of our data. The total number of states among which South Carolina is ranked is noted in the graph.

Sources
  1. “Quick Facts Education in South Carolina,” South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/scdoe/assets/File/data/Quick%20Facts/QuickFacts%202015%20May.pdf.
  2. “ED Data Express,” U.S. Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://eddataexpress.ed.gov/state-tables-main.cfm.

Preparing for postsecondary education

How the system is working

ACT scores

The ACT is an indicator of students’ preparation for postsecondary success, and the data show that many South Carolina students are leaving high school underprepared for college. Beginning in the spring of 2016, all public high schools are required to offer the ACT to every student in the 11th grade at no cost.

Percentage of high school graduates taking the ACT
Average ACT composite scores
South Carolina
United States
South Carolina
United States
South Carolina
United States
South Carolina
United States
Percentage of ACT-takers meeting all four college readiness benchmarks (English, math, reading, science)
All students
African American/ Black
American Indian/ Alaskan Native
Caucasian American/ White
Hispanic
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
African American/ Black
American Indian/ Alaskan Native
Caucasian American/ White
Hispanic
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
African American/ Black
American Indian/ Alaskan Native
Caucasian American/ White
Hispanic
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
African American/ Black
American Indian/ Alaskan Native
Caucasian American/ White
Hispanic
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
African American/ Black
American Indian/ Alaskan Native
Caucasian American/ White
Hispanic
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
African American/ Black
American Indian/ Alaskan Native
Caucasian American/ White
Hispanic
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
African American/ Black
American Indian/ Alaskan Native
Caucasian American/ White
Hispanic
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
African American/ Black
American Indian/ Alaskan Native
Caucasian American/ White
Hispanic
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races

*2006 was the first year ACT reported student subgroup data in its current format.

Note:
2010 South Carolina and United States and 2006 South Carolina Asian subgroup numbers include Pacific Islanders.

Percentage of South Carolina ACT-takers meeting college readiness benchmarks, by subject
All students
Black/African American
American Indian/Alaskan Native
White
Hispanic/Latino
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
Black/African American
American Indian/Alaskan Native
White
Hispanic/Latino
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
Black/African American
American Indian/Alaskan Native
White
Hispanic/Latino
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
Black/African American
American Indian/Alaskan Native
White
Hispanic/Latino
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
Black/African American
American Indian/Alaskan Native
White
Hispanic/Latino
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
Black/African American
American Indian/Alaskan Native
White
Hispanic/Latino
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
Black/African American
American Indian/Alaskan Native
White
Hispanic/Latino
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
All students
Black/African American
American Indian/Alaskan Native
White
Hispanic/Latino
Asian
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
Sources
  1. “The ACT,” South Carolina Department of Education last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/tests/high/the-act/.
  2. Graphs 1 and 2: "The Condition for College and Career Readiness 2016: South Carolina," ACT, last accessed October 10, 2016, http://www.act.org/research.
  3. Graphs 1-3: “ACT National and State Scores,” ACT, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://forms.act.org/newsroom/act-national-and-sta.../.
  4. Graph 4: “The ACT Profile Report - State: South Carolina”,ACT, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://forms.act.org/newsroom/data/2015/pdf/profile/SouthCarolina.pdf.

SAT scores

The SAT is a standardized test often used in the college admissions process. The current test consists of three 800 point sections testing English/Language Arts, Mathematics, and Writing. A record number of U.S. students took the SAT in 2015, but only 42% of them reached the college and career readiness benchmark of 1550.

Percentage of public school seniors taking the SAT
2015
2014
2013
2012
Average SAT scores* in South Carolina
  • Critical reading
  • Math
  • Writing
  • Total score (out of 2400 possible points)
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{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} South Carolina
1550 College and career-readiness benchmark

*A total score of 1550 is the college-and career-ready benchmark set by the College Board.

Average SAT scores* by race/ethnicity
  • Critical reading
  • Math
  • Writing
  • Total score (out of 2400 possible points)
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} American Indian or Alaska Native
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Asian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Black or African American
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Mexican or Mexican American
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Puerto Rican
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Other Hispanic, Latino, or Latin American
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} White
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Other
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} No response
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} American Indian or Alaska Native
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Asian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Black or African American
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Mexican or Mexican American
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Puerto Rican
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Other Hispanic, Latino, or Latin American
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} White
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} Other
{{{values}}} = {{{max}}} No response
1550 College and career-readiness benchmark

*A total score of 1550 is the college- and career-ready benchmark set by the College Board.

Average SAT scores* nationwide
 Critical readingMathWritingTotal score
Illinois
Illinois
599Critical reading
616Math
587Writing
1802Total score
5996165871802
North Dakota
North Dakota
597Critical reading
608Math
586Writing
1791Total score
5976085861791
Michigan
Michigan
594Critical reading
609Math
585Writing
1788Total score
5946095851788
Minnesota
Minnesota
595Critical reading
607Math
576Writing
1778Total score
5956075761778
Missouri
Missouri
596Critical reading
599Math
582Writing
1777Total score
5965995821777
Wisconsin
Wisconsin
591Critical reading
605Math
575Writing
1771Total score
5916055751771
Iowa
Iowa
589Critical reading
600Math
566Writing
1755Total score
5896005661755
Nebraska
Nebraska
589Critical reading
590Math
576Writing
1755Total score
5895905761755
South Dakota
South Dakota
592Critical reading
597Math
564Writing
1753Total score
5925975641753
Kentucky
Kentucky
588Critical reading
587Math
574Writing
1749Total score
5885875741749
Kansas
Kansas
588Critical reading
592Math
568Writing
1748Total score
5885925681748
Wyoming
Wyoming
589Critical reading
586Math
562Writing
1737Total score
5895865621737
Colorado
Colorado
582Critical reading
587Math
567Writing
1736Total score
5825875671736
Tennessee
Tennessee
581Critical reading
574Math
568Writing
1723Total score
5815745681723
Mississippi
Mississippi
580Critical reading
563Math
570Writing
1713Total score
5805635701713
Utah
Utah
579Critical reading
575Math
554Writing
1708Total score
5795755541708
Oklahoma
Oklahoma
576Critical reading
569Math
548Writing
1693Total score
5765695481693
Arkansas
Arkansas
568Critical reading
569Math
551Writing
1688Total score
5685695511688
Louisiana
Louisiana
563Critical reading
559Math
553Writing
1675Total score
5635595531675
Ohio
Ohio
557Critical reading
563Math
537Writing
1657Total score
5575635371657
Montana
Montana
561Critical reading
556Math
538Writing
1655Total score
5615565381655
New Mexico
New Mexico
551Critical reading
544Math
528Writing
1623Total score
5515445281623
Alabama
Alabama
545Critical reading
538Math
533Writing
1616Total score
5455385331616
New Hampshire
New Hampshire
525Critical reading
530Math
511Writing
1566Total score
5255305111566
Vermont
Vermont
523Critical reading
524Math
507Writing
1554Total score
5235245071554
Arizona
Arizona
523Critical reading
527Math
502Writing
1552Total score
5235275021552
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
516Critical reading
529Math
507Writing
1552Total score
5165295071552
Oregon
Oregon
523Critical reading
521Math
502Writing
1546Total score
5235215021546
Virginia
Virginia
518Critical reading
516Math
499Writing
1533Total score
5185164991533
New Jersey
New Jersey
500Critical reading
521Math
499Writing
1520Total score
5005214991520
Connecticut
Connecticut
504Critical reading
506Math
504Writing
1514Total score
5045065041514
West Virginia
West Virginia
509Critical reading
497Math
495Writing
1501Total score
5094974951501
Washington
Washington
502Critical reading
510Math
484Writing
1496Total score
5025104841496
Alaska
Alaska
509Critical reading
503Math
482Writing
1494Total score
5095034821494
California
California
495Critical reading
506Math
491Writing
1492Total score
4955064911492
United States
United States
495Critical reading
511Math
484Writing
1490Total score
4955114841490
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
499Critical reading
504Math
482Writing
1485Total score
4995044821485
North Carolina
North Carolina
498Critical reading
504Math
476Writing
1478Total score
4985044761478
Indiana
Indiana
496Critical reading
499Math
478Writing
1473Total score
4964994781473
Hawaii
Hawaii
487Critical reading
508Math
477Writing
1472Total score
4875084771472
Rhode Island
Rhode Island
494Critical reading
494Math
484Writing
1472Total score
4944944841472
New York
New York
489Critical reading
502Math
478Writing
1469Total score
4895024781469
Maryland
Maryland
491Critical reading
493Math
478Writing
1462Total score
4914934781462
Nevada
Nevada
494Critical reading
494Math
470Writing
1458Total score
4944944701458
Georgia
Georgia
490Critical reading
485Math
475Writing
1450Total score
4904854751450
South Carolina
South Carolina
488Critical reading
487Math
467Writing
1442Total score
4884874671442
Florida
Florida
486Critical reading
480Math
468Writing
1434Total score
4864804681434
Texas
Texas
470Critical reading
486Math
454Writing
1410Total score
4704864541410
Maine
Maine
468Critical reading
473Math
451Writing
1392Total score
4684734511392
Idaho
Idaho
467Critical reading
463Math
442Writing
1372Total score
4674634421372
Delaware
Delaware
462Critical reading
461Math
445Writing
1368Total score
4624614451368
District of Columbia
District of Columbia
441Critical reading
440Math
432Writing
1313Total score
4414404321313
 Critical readingMathWritingTotal score
Illinois
Illinois
599Critical reading
616Math
587Writing
1802Total score
5996165871802
North Dakota
North Dakota
597Critical reading
608Math
586Writing
1791Total score
5976085861791
Michigan
Michigan
594Critical reading
609Math
585Writing
1788Total score
5946095851788
Minnesota
Minnesota
595Critical reading
607Math
576Writing
1778Total score
5956075761778
Missouri
Missouri
596Critical reading
599Math
582Writing
1777Total score
5965995821777
Wisconsin
Wisconsin
591Critical reading
605Math
575Writing
1771Total score
5916055751771
Iowa
Iowa
589Critical reading
600Math
566Writing
1755Total score
5896005661755
Nebraska
Nebraska
589Critical reading
590Math
576Writing
1755Total score
5895905761755
South Dakota
South Dakota
592Critical reading
597Math
564Writing
1753Total score
5925975641753
Kentucky
Kentucky
588Critical reading
587Math
574Writing
1749Total score
5885875741749
Kansas
Kansas
588Critical reading
592Math
568Writing
1748Total score
5885925681748
Wyoming
Wyoming
589Critical reading
586Math
562Writing
1737Total score
5895865621737
Colorado
Colorado
582Critical reading
587Math
567Writing
1736Total score
5825875671736
Tennessee
Tennessee
581Critical reading
574Math
568Writing
1723Total score
5815745681723
Mississippi
Mississippi
580Critical reading
563Math
570Writing
1713Total score
5805635701713
Utah
Utah
579Critical reading
575Math
554Writing
1708Total score
5795755541708
Oklahoma
Oklahoma
576Critical reading
569Math
548Writing
1693Total score
5765695481693
Arkansas
Arkansas
568Critical reading
569Math
551Writing
1688Total score
5685695511688
Louisiana
Louisiana
563Critical reading
559Math
553Writing
1675Total score
5635595531675
Ohio
Ohio
557Critical reading
563Math
537Writing
1657Total score
5575635371657
Montana
Montana
561Critical reading
556Math
538Writing
1655Total score
5615565381655
New Mexico
New Mexico
551Critical reading
544Math
528Writing
1623Total score
5515445281623
Alabama
Alabama
545Critical reading
538Math
533Writing
1616Total score
5455385331616
New Hampshire
New Hampshire
525Critical reading
530Math
511Writing
1566Total score
5255305111566
Vermont
Vermont
523Critical reading
524Math
507Writing
1554Total score
5235245071554
Arizona
Arizona
523Critical reading
527Math
502Writing
1552Total score
5235275021552
 Critical readingMathWritingTotal score
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
516Critical reading
529Math
507Writing
1552Total score
5165295071552
Oregon
Oregon
523Critical reading
521Math
502Writing
1546Total score
5235215021546
Virginia
Virginia
518Critical reading
516Math
499Writing
1533Total score
5185164991533
New Jersey
New Jersey
500Critical reading
521Math
499Writing
1520Total score
5005214991520
Connecticut
Connecticut
504Critical reading
506Math
504Writing
1514Total score
5045065041514
West Virginia
West Virginia
509Critical reading
497Math
495Writing
1501Total score
5094974951501
Washington
Washington
502Critical reading
510Math
484Writing
1496Total score
5025104841496
Alaska
Alaska
509Critical reading
503Math
482Writing
1494Total score
5095034821494
California
California
495Critical reading
506Math
491Writing
1492Total score
4955064911492
United States
United States
495Critical reading
511Math
484Writing
1490Total score
4955114841490
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
499Critical reading
504Math
482Writing
1485Total score
4995044821485
North Carolina
North Carolina
498Critical reading
504Math
476Writing
1478Total score
4985044761478
Indiana
Indiana
496Critical reading
499Math
478Writing
1473Total score
4964994781473
Hawaii
Hawaii
487Critical reading
508Math
477Writing
1472Total score
4875084771472
Rhode Island
Rhode Island
494Critical reading
494Math
484Writing
1472Total score
4944944841472
New York
New York
489Critical reading
502Math
478Writing
1469Total score
4895024781469
Maryland
Maryland
491Critical reading
493Math
478Writing
1462Total score
4914934781462
Nevada
Nevada
494Critical reading
494Math
470Writing
1458Total score
4944944701458
Georgia
Georgia
490Critical reading
485Math
475Writing
1450Total score
4904854751450
South Carolina
South Carolina
488Critical reading
487Math
467Writing
1442Total score
4884874671442
Florida
Florida
486Critical reading
480Math
468Writing
1434Total score
4864804681434
Texas
Texas
470Critical reading
486Math
454Writing
1410Total score
4704864541410
Maine
Maine
468Critical reading
473Math
451Writing
1392Total score
4684734511392
Idaho
Idaho
467Critical reading
463Math
442Writing
1372Total score
4674634421372
Delaware
Delaware
462Critical reading
461Math
445Writing
1368Total score
4624614451368
District of Columbia
District of Columbia
441Critical reading
440Math
432Writing
1313Total score
4414404321313

*A total score of 1550 is the college- and career-ready benchmark set by the College Board.

Note:
Due to differing SAT participation rates across states, readers are discouraged from making direct comparisons between state scores. In states with low participation rates, scores may be skewed by self-selection into the exam.

Sources
  1. Graph 1: “SAT,” South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/data/test-scores/national-assessments/sat/.
  2. Graph 2: “2010 College-Bound Seniors State Profile Report: South Carolina,” College Board, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/research/SC_10_03_03_01.pdf.
  3. Graph 2: “2015 College-Bound Seniors State Profile Report: South Carolina,” College Board, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/sat/SC_15_03_03_01.pdf.
  4. Graph 3: “2015 College-Bound Seniors State Profile Report: South Carolina,” College Board, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/sat/SC_15_03_03_01.pdf.
  5. Graph 4: “College-Bound Seniors Reports,” College Board, last accessed February 3, 2016, https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/k12-educators/score-reports/college-bound-seniors-reports.

AP Scores

Since 1984, each school district in South Carolina has been required to provide Advanced Placement (AP) courses in all secondary schools that include grades 11 or 12. These classes prepare students for the national AP examinations. Students who score 3, 4, or 5 on an AP exam are generally considered qualified to receive credit for the equivalent course(s) at colleges and universities that give credit for AP exams.

Average AP exam scores by race/ethnicity
South Carolina United States
All students2.822.82
American Indian2.712.44
Asian3.233.18
Black2.072.05
Mexican American2.352.33
Puerto Rican2.562.47
Other Hispanic2.822.42
White2.932.98
swipe to explore the table
South Carolina United States
All students2.792.84
American Indian2.472.43
Asian3.283.15
Black2.011.92
Mexican American2.562.38
Puerto Rican2.622.39
Other Hispanic2.702.45
White2.892.99
swipe to explore the table
South Carolina United States
All students2.782.89
American Indian2.302.45
Asian3.153.05
Black1.992.01
Mexican American3.032.38
Puerto Rican2.772.54
Other Hispanic2.852.69
White2.872.99
swipe to explore the table
Sources
  1. “AP,” South Carolina Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://ed.sc.gov/data/test-scores/national-assessments/ap/.
  2. “AP Data,” College Board, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://research.collegeboard.org/programs/ap/data.

Postsecondary education outcomes

How the system is working

College enrollment

Estimated percentage of high school graduates (public and private) enrolling in college within 12 months of graduation
 Value
1. Mississippi
Mississippi
78.8Value
78.8
2. Connecticut
Connecticut
70.8Value
70.8
3. Massachusetts
Massachusetts
70.7Value
70.7
4. New York
New York
70.0Value
70.0
5. Minnesota
Minnesota
69.9Value
69.9
6. New Mexico
New Mexico
69.4Value
69.4
7. South Dakota
South Dakota
68.9Value
68.9
8. New Jersey
New Jersey
67.9Value
67.9
9. Arkansas
Arkansas
67.2Value
67.2
10. Rhode Island
Rhode Island
67.1Value
67.1
11. Georgia
Georgia
66.5Value
66.5
T-12. South Carolina
South Carolina
65.3Value
65.3
T-12. Kansas
Kansas
65.3Value
65.3
14. North Dakota
North Dakota
64.9Value
64.9
15. Delaware
Delaware
64.8Value
64.8
T-16. Hawaii
Hawaii
64.7Value
64.7
T-16. Louisiana
Louisiana
64.7Value
64.7
T-18. Virginia
Virginia
64.6Value
64.6
T-18. Nebraska
Nebraska
64.6Value
64.6
20. Indiana
Indiana
63.0Value
63.0
21. Kentucky
Kentucky
62.9Value
62.9
22. Florida
Florida
62.8Value
62.8
T-23. Missouri
Missouri
61.9Value
61.9
T-23. North Carolina
North Carolina
61.9Value
61.9
T-25. New Hampshire
New Hampshire
61.7Value
61.7
United States
United States
61.7Value
61.7
26. Michigan
Michigan
61.5Value
61.5
27. Maryland
Maryland
60.5Value
60.5
28. Tennessee
Tennessee
60.4Value
60.4
29. Illinois
Illinois
60.2Value
60.2
30. Ohio
Ohio
59.9Value
59.9
31. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
59.4Value
59.4
32. Alabama
Alabama
59.3Value
59.3
33. Colorado
Colorado
59.2Value
59.2
34. Wisconsin
Wisconsin
58.6Value
58.6
35. California
California
58.5Value
58.5
36. Montana
Montana
58.3Value
58.3
T-37. Texas
Texas
57.7Value
57.7
T-37. Oklahoma
Oklahoma
57.7Value
57.7
39. Wyoming
Wyoming
56.6Value
56.6
40. Iowa
Iowa
56.5Value
56.5
41. West Virginia
West Virginia
55.7Value
55.7
42. Nevada
Nevada
54.1Value
54.1
43. Maine
Maine
53.9Value
53.9
44. Vermont
Vermont
53.2Value
53.2
45. Arizona
Arizona
53.1Value
53.1
46. Utah
Utah
50.8Value
50.8
47. Idaho
Idaho
48.2Value
48.2
48. Washington
Washington
48.0Value
48.0
49. Oregon
Oregon
46.9Value
46.9
50. Alaska
Alaska
45.6Value
45.6
51. District of Columbia
District of Columbia
43.4Value
43.4
 Value
1. Mississippi
Mississippi
78.8Value
78.8
2. Connecticut
Connecticut
70.8Value
70.8
3. Massachusetts
Massachusetts
70.7Value
70.7
4. New York
New York
70.0Value
70.0
5. Minnesota
Minnesota
69.9Value
69.9
6. New Mexico
New Mexico
69.4Value
69.4
7. South Dakota
South Dakota
68.9Value
68.9
8. New Jersey
New Jersey
67.9Value
67.9
9. Arkansas
Arkansas
67.2Value
67.2
10. Rhode Island
Rhode Island
67.1Value
67.1
11. Georgia
Georgia
66.5Value
66.5
T-12. South Carolina
South Carolina
65.3Value
65.3
T-12. Kansas
Kansas
65.3Value
65.3
14. North Dakota
North Dakota
64.9Value
64.9
15. Delaware
Delaware
64.8Value
64.8
T-16. Hawaii
Hawaii
64.7Value
64.7
T-16. Louisiana
Louisiana
64.7Value
64.7
T-18. Virginia
Virginia
64.6Value
64.6
 Value
T-18. Nebraska
Nebraska
64.6Value
64.6
20. Indiana
Indiana
63.0Value
63.0
21. Kentucky
Kentucky
62.9Value
62.9
22. Florida
Florida
62.8Value
62.8
T-23. Missouri
Missouri
61.9Value
61.9
T-23. North Carolina
North Carolina
61.9Value
61.9
T-25. New Hampshire
New Hampshire
61.7Value
61.7
United States
United States
61.7Value
61.7
26. Michigan
Michigan
61.5Value
61.5
27. Maryland
Maryland
60.5Value
60.5
28. Tennessee
Tennessee
60.4Value
60.4
29. Illinois
Illinois
60.2Value
60.2
30. Ohio
Ohio
59.9Value
59.9
31. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
59.4Value
59.4
32. Alabama
Alabama
59.3Value
59.3
33. Colorado
Colorado
59.2Value
59.2
34. Wisconsin
Wisconsin
58.6Value
58.6
35. California
California
58.5Value
58.5
 Value
36. Montana
Montana
58.3Value
58.3
T-37. Texas
Texas
57.7Value
57.7
T-37. Oklahoma
Oklahoma
57.7Value
57.7
39. Wyoming
Wyoming
56.6Value
56.6
40. Iowa
Iowa
56.5Value
56.5
41. West Virginia
West Virginia
55.7Value
55.7
42. Nevada
Nevada
54.1Value
54.1
43. Maine
Maine
53.9Value
53.9
44. Vermont
Vermont
53.2Value
53.2
45. Arizona
Arizona
53.1Value
53.1
46. Utah
Utah
50.8Value
50.8
47. Idaho
Idaho
48.2Value
48.2
48. Washington
Washington
48.0Value
48.0
49. Oregon
Oregon
46.9Value
46.9
50. Alaska
Alaska
45.6Value
45.6
51. District of Columbia
District of Columbia
43.4Value
43.4
Percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds enrolled in degree-granting postsecondary institutions
Total
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Pacific Islander
American Indian/Alaska Native
Two or more races
Total
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Pacific Islander
American Indian/Alaska Native
Two or more races
Total
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Pacific Islander
American Indian/Alaska Native
Two or more races
Total
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Pacific Islander
American Indian/Alaska Native
Two or more races
Sources
  1. Graph 1: “Estimated rate of 2011-2012 high school graduates attending degree-granting postsecondary institutions, by state,” U.S. Department of Education National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics (browse by year), last accessed June 24, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/current_tables.asp.
  2. Graph 2: “Percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds enrolled in degree-granting postsecondary institutions, by race/ethnicity and state: 2004: Table 302.70,” U.S. Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d15/tables/dt15_302.70.asp?current=yes.
  3. Graph 2: “Percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds enrolled in degree-granting postsecondary institutions, by race/ethnicity and state: 2014: Table 302.65,” U.S. Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d15/tables/dt15_302.65.asp?current=yes.

College completion

Percentage of South Carolina college students graduating from two-year public colleges within three years
All students
American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian or Pacific Islander
Asian
Black or African American
Hispanic or Latino
White
Two or more races
All students
American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian or Pacific Islander
Asian
Black or African American
Hispanic or Latino
White
Two or more races
All students
American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian or Pacific Islander
Asian
Black or African American
Hispanic or Latino
White
Two or more races
All students
American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian or Pacific Islander
Asian
Black or African American
Hispanic or Latino
White
Two or more races

Note:
The three-year graduation rate for a cohort year is the percentage of students matriculating in the fall of that year who graduate by the spring of the year three years later. For example, the three-year graduation rate for members of cohort year 2011 is the percentage of those students graduating by the spring of 2014.

Percentage of South Carolina college students graduating from four-year public universities within six years
All students
American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian or Pacific Islander
Asian
Black or African American
Hispanic or Latino
White
All students
American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian or Pacific Islander
Asian
Black or African American
Hispanic or Latino
White
All students
American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian or Pacific Islander
Asian
Black or African American
Hispanic or Latino
White
All students
American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian or Pacific Islander
Asian
Black or African American
Hispanic or Latino
White
Percentage of college students nationwide graduating from four-year public universities within six years
 Value
1. Delaware
Delaware
73.2Value
73.2
2. Virginia
Virginia
70.4Value
70.4
3. Iowa
Iowa
68.4Value
68.4
4. New Jersey
New Jersey
68.3Value
68.3
5. New Hampshire
New Hampshire
67.8Value
67.8
6. California
California
65.9Value
65.9
7. Vermont
Vermont
64.2Value
64.2
8. Connecticut
Connecticut
63.5Value
63.5
T-9. Maryland
Maryland
63.0Value
63.0
T-9. North Carolina
North Carolina
63.0Value
63.0
11. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
62.8Value
62.8
12. Illinois
Illinois
62.3Value
62.3
13. South Carolina
South Carolina
61.3Value
61.3
14. Massachusetts
Massachusetts
59.5Value
59.5
15. Washington
Washington
59.3Value
59.3
16. Minnesota
Minnesota
59.2Value
59.2
17. Arizona
Arizona
59.0Value
59.0
18. Wisconsin
Wisconsin
58.6Value
58.6
T-19. Michigan
Michigan
58.2Value
58.2
T-19. Oregon
Oregon
58.2Value
58.2
21. Nebraska
Nebraska
57.0Value
57.0
22. Missouri
Missouri
55.9Value
55.9
United States
United States
55.6Value
55.6
T-23. Colorado
Colorado
54.4Value
54.4
T-23. Rhode Island
Rhode Island
54.4Value
54.4
25. Indiana
Indiana
54.2Value
54.2
26. Wyoming
Wyoming
54.0Value
54.0
27. New York
New York
53.5Value
53.5
28. Kansas
Kansas
53.0Value
53.0
29. Mississippi
Mississippi
52.3Value
52.3
30. Ohio
Ohio
52.2Value
52.2
31. North Dakota
North Dakota
51.3Value
51.3
32. Florida
Florida
50.8Value
50.8
33. Texas
Texas
50.6Value
50.6
34. Alabama
Alabama
50.4Value
50.4
35. South Dakota
South Dakota
50.2Value
50.2
36. Tennessee
Tennessee
49.5Value
49.5
37. Maine
Maine
48.2Value
48.2
38. Kentucky
Kentucky
47.9Value
47.9
39. Louisiana
Louisiana
46.1Value
46.1
40. Hawaii
Hawaii
45.4Value
45.4
41. West Virginia
West Virginia
44.7Value
44.7
42. Montana
Montana
44.5Value
44.5
43. Utah
Utah
43.8Value
43.8
44. Oklahoma
Oklahoma
43.7Value
43.7
45. Arkansas
Arkansas
42.1Value
42.1
46. Georgia
Georgia
41.3Value
41.3
47. New Mexico
New Mexico
40.9Value
40.9
48. Idaho
Idaho
40.8Value
40.8
49. Nevada
Nevada
35.4Value
35.4
50. Alaska
Alaska
26.9Value
26.9
51. District of Columbia
District of Columbia
13.3Value
13.3
 Value
1. Delaware
Delaware
73.2Value
73.2
2. Virginia
Virginia
70.4Value
70.4
3. Iowa
Iowa
68.4Value
68.4
4. New Jersey
New Jersey
68.3Value
68.3
5. New Hampshire
New Hampshire
67.8Value
67.8
6. California
California
65.9Value
65.9
7. Vermont
Vermont
64.2Value
64.2
8. Connecticut
Connecticut
63.5Value
63.5
T-9. Maryland
Maryland
63.0Value
63.0
T-9. North Carolina
North Carolina
63.0Value
63.0
11. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
62.8Value
62.8
12. Illinois
Illinois
62.3Value
62.3
13. South Carolina
South Carolina
61.3Value
61.3
14. Massachusetts
Massachusetts
59.5Value
59.5
15. Washington
Washington
59.3Value
59.3
16. Minnesota
Minnesota
59.2Value
59.2
17. Arizona
Arizona
59.0Value
59.0
18. Wisconsin
Wisconsin
58.6Value
58.6
 Value
T-19. Michigan
Michigan
58.2Value
58.2
T-19. Oregon
Oregon
58.2Value
58.2
21. Nebraska
Nebraska
57.0Value
57.0
22. Missouri
Missouri
55.9Value
55.9
United States
United States
55.6Value
55.6
T-23. Colorado
Colorado
54.4Value
54.4
T-23. Rhode Island
Rhode Island
54.4Value
54.4
25. Indiana
Indiana
54.2Value
54.2
26. Wyoming
Wyoming
54.0Value
54.0
27. New York
New York
53.5Value
53.5
28. Kansas
Kansas
53.0Value
53.0
29. Mississippi
Mississippi
52.3Value
52.3
30. Ohio
Ohio
52.2Value
52.2
31. North Dakota
North Dakota
51.3Value
51.3
32. Florida
Florida
50.8Value
50.8
33. Texas
Texas
50.6Value
50.6
34. Alabama
Alabama
50.4Value
50.4
35. South Dakota
South Dakota
50.2Value
50.2
 Value
36. Tennessee
Tennessee
49.5Value
49.5
37. Maine
Maine
48.2Value
48.2
38. Kentucky
Kentucky
47.9Value
47.9
39. Louisiana
Louisiana
46.1Value
46.1
40. Hawaii
Hawaii
45.4Value
45.4
41. West Virginia
West Virginia
44.7Value
44.7
42. Montana
Montana
44.5Value
44.5
43. Utah
Utah
43.8Value
43.8
44. Oklahoma
Oklahoma
43.7Value
43.7
45. Arkansas
Arkansas
42.1Value
42.1
46. Georgia
Georgia
41.3Value
41.3
47. New Mexico
New Mexico
40.9Value
40.9
48. Idaho
Idaho
40.8Value
40.8
49. Nevada
Nevada
35.4Value
35.4
50. Alaska
Alaska
26.9Value
26.9
51. District of Columbia
District of Columbia
13.3Value
13.3
Percentage of individuals age 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher
Total
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
Total
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
Total
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
Total
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
Sources
  1. Graphs 1-3: “IPEDS Trend Generator,” U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, last accessed August 1, 2016, http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/trendgenerator/.
  2. Graph 4: “Educational attainment of persons 25 years old and over, by race/ethnicity and state: April 1990 and April 2000: Table 12,” U.S. Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d07/tables/dt07_012.asp.
  3. Graph 4: “Rates of high school completion and bachelor's degree attainment among persons age 25 and over, by race/ethnicity and state: 2014: Table 104.85,” U.S. Department of Education, last accessed August 1, 2016, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d15/tables/dt15_104.85.asp?current=yes.

Education and the workforce

How the system is working

Workforce opportunities for students by education level and field

Percentage of jobs requiring minimum levels of education by 2020 (projected)
High school diploma or less
Some college, an associate’s degree, or postsecondary vocational certification
Bachelor’s degree
Master’s degree or higher
High school diploma or less
Some college, an associate’s degree, or postsecondary vocational certification
Bachelor’s degree
Master’s degree or higher
Occupational growth rates in South Carolina, 2010–2020 (projected)
Healthcare support32%
Social sciences29%
Healthcare professional and technical27%
Food and personal services22%
STEM fields22%
Community services and arts23%
Managerial and professional office21%
Education16%
Sales and office support15%
Blue collar12%
swipe to explore the table
Source
  1. Graphs 1-2: “Recovery: Projections of Jobs and Education Requirements through 2020,” Georgetown University (June 2013), last accessed August 1, 2016. https://cew.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/StateProjections_6.1.15_agc_v2.pdf.

Education level and earnings

As the demand for college-educated workers grows, students without postsecondary credentials are seeing large gaps in earning potential.

Median earnings in the past 12 months by educational attainment for individuals age 25 and over
Source
  1. “Median Earnings in the Past 12 Months (In 2014 Inflation-Adjusted Dollars) by Sex, by Educational Attainment for the Population 25 Years and Over,” United States Census Bureau, last accessed August 4, 2016, http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_05_EST_B20004&prodType=table.

Conclusion

The data highlighted above help us understand how our students and schools are faring, but this is just a first step. The next step is to take what you’ve learned here, use it to reflect on what’s needed for South Carolina students and take action to help ensure all of our students have access to an excellent education.

While South Carolina’s public education system has many areas of needed improvement, the good news is that we are also home to many schools and educators that are supporting students as they grow and learn. We’re also home to policymakers and advocates who are dedicated to passing and implementing commonsense policies that will help every student, in every school, thrive.

We hope you will use these data as a starting point to join this conversation and this work, with the goal of building a South Carolina where all students succeed—a vision we know we can and must achieve.